Bear News

Beartown News

SEPTEMBER 1, 2003

LETTERS

THE NEW? VERMONT

Is it something in the water? This tiny but turbulent state produces more exotic politics than it can consume locally. You could fit two Vermonts into California's San Bernardino County. Vermont's population is roughly the same size as that of Hidalgo County, Texas.
Vermont's only congressman, Bernie Sanders, calls himself a socialist and runs as an Independent.
Two years ago Sen. James Jeffords, after 34 years in public life as a Republican, defected from the party, having suddenly discovered that he, too, is an independent.
Like Bernie Sanders, Jeffords is an "Independent" who is a dependable vote for the Democrats.
Vermont's other senator, Patrick Leahy, is the quarterback of Senate Democrats blocking confirmation
of the president's judicial nominees.
Governor Howard Dean is the Che Guevara ? the rhetorical bomb-thrower ? of the Democratic presidential nomination scramble.
Vermont's most conspicuous industry is ice cream, left-wing ice cream ? Ben & Jerry's. The Ben of that firm ? Ben Cohen ? is spurning Howard Dean and supporting Dennis Kucinich for the Democratic nomination because Dean is not liberal enough.
Change From Old Days, Vermont has changed.
In the 1936 presidential landslide, when Franklin D. Roosevelt carried all but two states, he did not carry
Vermont. And Vermont's greatest gift to American politics was a taciturn conservative ? the sainted
Calvin Coolidge, who was born in Plymouth Notch, Vermont. For a few years, the fiercely conservative
Alexander Solzhenitsyn lived in Vermont.
Today, Vermont attracts a lot of residents from elsewhere. Bernie Sanders is from Brooklyn, Dean from
Long Island, N.Y.
Since 2000, when Vermont legalized civil unions for same-sex couples, thousands of such couples have come to Vermont to be, I guess, not married but civil unionized.
Perhaps we should now think of Vermont not as a state, but as a commune ? a commune whose flag should have the shape of an ice cream cone.

George Will
ABC News


Holiday Inn vs. Nursing Home

I just heard on CNN that the average cost for a Nursing Home per day in the USA is $188!!
Now, I figure it this way, I can get a real nice room at the Holiday Inn for around $65... that
leaves $123 for beer, food (room service), laundry, Elvis collectibles, gratuities and clothes.
They have a swimming pool, some even have a workout room (therapy), a lounge, cable
(recreation), washer dryer (if I am too impaired, a child or grandchild can pick up my clothes
once a week, or they could rotate, that way everyone would only have to do it twice a year).
Most have free toothpaste and razors, but all have free shampoo and soap.
There may be a bit of a wait to get that first floor room, but that's all right, it takes months to
get into some Nursing Homes. There is the Senior bus, the Handicap bus, a Church bus or
van, cabs, alert cabs, and in some cities The Duck!
You have security and if someone sees you drop over, I am sure they would call an ambulance
(if you break your hip, hopefully the family would be smart enough to sue). What more could
you ask for?!
With AARP and other Senior discounts, I could be livin pretty dern nicely.
So, when I reach that Golden age help me keep my grin, just check my ole rickety butt into the nearest Holiday Inn!

GRANNY GRUNT


 


Email: dernc@sover.net


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